Arc’teryx made the Lithic lineup specifically for backcountry ski and splitboarding, so naturally we had to test them out. We have been using the Arc’teryx Stinger bibs for the last few seasons, so the bar was set high for an all out bib! What could Arc’teryx have done to make the Lithic Comp bibs a backcountry specific design? Would their mad scientists create a perfect backcountry pant? Let’s see….

Arc'teryx Acrteryx Lithic Comp Bib review

The Lithic Comp Bib is made of two fabrics – most of the body is made of 70D nylon with Goretex 3 layer waterproof breathable membrane (N70P 3l, not ProShell). The remaining parts (waist, back, and back of leg) are made of Arc’teryx proprietary soft-shell called Trusaro. Of course, there is Kepotec reinforcement on the inner parts of the bottom legs, to keep sharp edges and crampons from cutting through. The powder skirt is a bit unusual to us. It is unlike any other we have seen. it is very basic and does not stretch, nor does it have the usual hook to attach to laces or buckles. It does fit over large snowboard boots, though. (thank goodness!)

The fit is very good thanks to the XPD Expedition and e3D patterning. Meaning, they move with you very well when touring and are not too baggy to function. There are 2 large drop pockets on each thigh (nonzippered) and one zippered pocket a bit higher on the right side – perfect for you beacon (or phone and keys if you are not in the backcountry). We found that you can easily fit a pair of gloves and beanie in either thigh pocket.

Arc'teryx Acrteryx Lithic Comp Bib review

The pants are lightweight for how burly they are. Our XL came in just a few ounces over a pound. We had many tours in these bibs and found them to feel very nice when we are touring. There are 2 large side zippers to dump heat out on warm days.

For the MSRP of $425 you get a lot of bib and save some money over the Stinger Bib (though you do give up ProShell and some more zippered pockets).

For reference, the tester used XL and is 6’1” 200lb 33” waist.