ABUS 440A -The lock with a golden voice

ABUS 440A - James Terry - Engearment

ABUS 440A -The lock with a golden voice

James Terry

ABUS 440A - James Terry - Engearment

ABUS 440A – James Terry – Engearment

ABUS 440A review

We have been locking bicycles up to various objects for over 100 years now. Still being implemented today, the earliest methods were a simple padlock and steel chain. And while ABUS didn’t invent the bike lock per se, they did help its progression and development. Today we are checking out the ABUS 440A A U-Lock which is based around the physical security of the ever-popular Ultra 410 U-Lock. Only now we have an addition of a 100db alarm. Oh boy!

 

The u-lock is a classic when it comes to securing bikes, and for good reason. Solid materials and no moving parts outside the lock mechanism are an excellent starting point for the strongest resistance possible. But ABUS didn’t stop there. Oh no. They took it a step further and added an alarm which spits out an irritating 100db noise.

The front of the ABUS 440A. - James Terry - Engearment

The front of the ABUS 440A.

 

While the alarm isn’t as earsplitting as I was expecting, it does the job it was designed to do. For 15 seconds, the 440A U-Lock will sound an alarm at 100 dB, drawing attention to your bike, and the would-be thief, in hopes of deterring that theft. I actually got a measurement of 119 dB using my Apple watch. The lock also features warning beeps in the event some drunkard stumbles into your bike while you’re enjoying your sweet micro-brew.

The ABUS 440A measures at 119 dB on the Apple watch. - James Terry - Engearment

The ABUS 440A measures at 119 dB on the Apple watch.

 

 

This type of lock works best when locking up your bike in busy areas with some moderate foot traffic. Because what good is an alarm if there is no one around to hear it? And while I usually use a u-lock with a cable, I decided to just use the 440A by itself. My thought is that if someone is trying to take my wheels, then the 3D Position Detection system that ABUS is using will be triggered.

 

Using the ABUS 440A to lock up my Trek 820 to a stop sign - James Terry - Engearment

Using the ABUS 440A to lock up my Trek 820 to a stop sign

 

So here are the specs for all the number crunchers out there. There are two versions of the 440A. Both have a 12mm thick round shackle, a high-quality locking cylinder for high protection against manipulation, e.g., picking and dual locking mechanisms that locks the shackle in place. The differences come in shackle size. The smaller 440A has an internal shackle length of 160mm and an internal width of 85mm and weighs 1100 grams. The larger 440A is 230mm in length with an internal width of 108mm and weighs 1500 grams.

Using the ABUS 440A to lock up my Trek 820 to a stop sign - James Terry - Engearment

Using the ABUS 440A to lock up my Trek 820 to a stop sign

 

 

 

Arming the lock is straightforward. There are three key positions. Locked with no alarm, locked with alarm armed and the unlocked position. When in the alarm position you’ll hear a beep letting you know the 440A is armed and ready to annoy. When transporting or not using the alarm, you can put it into the unarmed position allowing you to go about your business without disturbing the peace.

 

The three modes on the ABUS 440A. Armed. Unlocked. Locked. - James Terry - Engearment

The three modes on the ABUS 440A. Armed. Unlocked. Locked.

 

 

As for power, the alarm uses a single CR2 battery which should last about 6 months. I would’ve liked to see a USB rechargeable version as they use in the 770A SmartX but that may have bumped up the suggested retail price of $89.99. The 440A is also water-resistant holding up to Colorado’s random spats of rain and snow.

A close up view of where the CR2 lives.

A close-up view of where the CR2 lives.

 

 

And finally, let’s talk about the mount. As a bicycle mechanic, I have had to install my fair share of lock mounts onto various types of bicycles, and to be polite, I’m rarely impressed. Though you need the key to get the 440A in and out of the mount, I find it pretty secure. Plus, you can either mount the lock inside the main triangle or you can mount it on the side, like on a rack.

Shots of the mount used to attach the ABUS 440A to a bicycle

Shots of the mount used to attach the ABUS 440A to a bicycle

 

 

Since I’ve only had this lock for a month now, I’ll have to do a follow-up review at the end of the year to see how it held up against the mean streets of Denver’s own Colfax Ave. And with bicycle thefts on the rise, I’m sure I’ll put this lock to the test. So, be sure to check back soon if you’d like to hear my unsolicited opinions on the ABUS 440A and general ramblings of bicycle security.

Using the ABUS 440A to lock up my Trek 820 to a stop sign

Using the ABUS 440A to lock up my Trek 820 to a stop sign

 


 

James Terry

A man of few words, James generally lets his mechanical skills and videos speak for him. And considering how much experience he’s got with each, they generally say some pretty cool stuff.

 

After graduating high school, James became a machinist mate on a US Navy submarine. He apparently grew tired of being in a claustrophobic tube under the sea, because he soon went to the other extreme, getting an A&P license and working on airplanes.
James Terry

James Terry

 

Finally, he met these two disciplines in the middle and began road tripping around the country as a mechanic for pro cycling teams. This is where he was introduced to photography and videography, working with the team content creators in his free time.
Once he stopped traveling and settled down in Denver, he continued wrenching on bikes and producing videos whenever he could. So at any given moment, you can probably find him with either a wrench or a DSLR in his hands (unless he’s got his hands full with his blue heeler, Wendy).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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