The North Face Women’s Ultra Fastpack III GTX

Incredibly Comfortable

I am SO impressed by these. My first impression was “ok, nice, but they don’t look super burly”.  Boy was I wrong! I took a risk and wore these for half a day before taking them on a 5 day backpacking/alpine trip.
The North Face- Womens Ultra Fastpack III GTX
I was really worried they wouldn’t hold up on the long miles and various terrain, but they proved me wrong. Even after several miles of carrying a heavy pack, the cushion in the footbed kept my feet happy. You know that feeling at the end of a long day when you take your hiking boots off and you want to cry because it feels so good? Well, I don’t get that feeling when I take these shoes off because my feet were never in pain.
The North Face- Womens Ultra Fastpack III GTX

The North Face Women’s Ultra Fastpack III GTX

They’re not restricting, they keep my feet relatively cool despite the waterproof Gore-Tex upper and I truly am comfortable in these all day. Now, speaking of the waterproofing, this is another aspect that had me floored. I can tromp through streams and my feet stay totally dry. I even held them under the faucet once and no water came through, pretty impressive if you ask me.
I quickly understood why they are called the “Fastpack” shoes. They’re incredibly light and fairly soft which helps you move with speed and ease. The only time me feet got a little sore/tired was after a lot of side-hilling. Sometimes I wished they were a little stiffer, particularly when on scree. I think that’s pretty normal, but that is the only flaws I could find in these.
The North Face- Womens Ultra Fastpack III GTX

The North Face Women’s Ultra Fastpack III GTX

The North Face Women’s Ultra Fastpack III GTX tested

I took these on a 16 mile ridge traverse and somehow my feet weren’t too sore at the end. I really underrated these when I first saw them, but I can express enough just how satisfied I am with them. The North Face has done it again! $160

 


Eliza Lockhart

Eliza Lockhart

Eliza Lockhart

Growing up snowboarding and hiking in the bitter cold winters and humid summers of northern Vermont, Eliza learned how to beat up gear and quickly became infatuated with new technologies. After moving to Colorado in 2015 to pursue a degree in recreation and outdoor education at Western Colorado University, her passion for the outdoors grew exponentially. Soon after, she picked up rock climbing, telemark skiing, backpacking, canyoneering, and is slowly learning to love rafting. Through these learning processes, Eliza began to understand the importance of the right gear and hopes to share her experiences and knowledge with others through Engearment.

Eliza Lockhart in water

Now working for Beacon Guidebooks as the ‘Wearer of Many Hats’ (yes, that is her official title), Eliza has learned the ins and outs of the outdoor industry. She has also worked on marketing teams, as a photographer, media coordinator, outdoor instructor and as a wrangler. She is especially excited to encourage other women in the outdoors and is an advocate for diversity and inclusion.

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