Patagonia Nano-Air Light Hybrid Jacket

My Patagonia Nano-Air jacket travels with me almost everywhere – it’s super versatile, dries quickly, and is warm for its bulk. Notably, it breathes really well, so you can wear it while hiking on a cold alpine-start morning without breaking a hard sweat. Often, if I’m chilly after a cold belay, I’ll just keep this jacket on while climbing the next pitch – I don’t tend to overheat while wearing it. 

Patagonia Nano-Air Light Hybrid Jacket

Patagonia Nano-Air Light Hybrid Jacket

I was a little disappointed that the older version didn’t stuff into its pocket, but they just released a new version, the Nano-Air Light Hybrid, that does, which is very convenient for clipping to a harness during a pitch. On a trip to the Bighorn Mountains in Wyoming to climb a sustained route up a broad face called Super Fortress, I brought this as an insulation layer along with a fleece long-sleeve shirt and a light windbreaker.

After a chilly belay on Super Fortress (5.11+) on Cloud Peak, WY I left my Patagonia Nano-Air Light Hybrid jacket on to follow the crux pitch. I warmed up quickly but didn’t start sweating. It’s a great jacket for light aerobic activity.

This jacket takes up very little room on the back of my harness so I had it with me all the time and was happy to have it at belays since a chilly wind was often whipping near 13,000 feet. After the colder belays, I left the jacket on to climb the pitch, and it’s so low-profile and athletically cut that I didn’t even notice it and could focus on the climbing. 

The Patagonia Nano-Air Light Hybrid Jacket is a great layer to have along on just about any excursion in any 3-season conditions. I threw it on to make camp in the Bighorn Mountains, WY.

Patagonia Nano-Air Light Hybrid Jacket review

This jacket is my go-to layer for active pursuits in colder temperatures, year-round, and the new Light Hybrid version is designed even better for climbers (it comes in a hooded version as well). $249

 


Patagonia Men's Nano-Air® Light Hybrid Hoody

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Drew Thayer

Drew’s love of gear is born from his life-long obsession with human-powered adventure in the mountains. On foot, on ski, on bike, and on the steep rocks, he loves exploring Colorado’s mountains through each season.
Drew brings a technical eye to gear — he’s a data scientist with a Masters’ degree in Geophysics and loves to understand the design and engineering make great gear what it is. He’s also worked in the field for many years — as a wilderness therapy field guide and a Geophysicist — and knows a thing or two about function and durability of technical equipment.
Drew tests gear in real mountain conditions, on overnight ventures whenever possible. His specialties are rock/alpine climbing and light-and-fast human-powered pursuits on ski or mountain bike. He’s ventured on exploratory climbing expeditions in Argentina, Peru, and Alaska, and completed remote technical river descents in Alaska and Colombia.
When not building statistical models and writing code, he can be found tending his garden or trying to keep up with his awesome wife.

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